Ancient Order of Agur
Initiation Ritual of the Trine Second Degree the Degree of Education



1912


W. C.: Bro. Keeper of the Scroll, are there any strangers in waiting?
K. of S.:
There are, Worthy Chief. Reads the names.
W. C.:
Bro. Toll Taker, has the toll been taken?
T. T.:
It has, Worthy Chief.
W. C.:
Bro. Guide, prepare the Cave for the reception.
Guide makes necessary arrangements.
G.:
Worthy Chief, the Cave is in readiness.
W. C.:
Bro. Guide, you will retire and prepare the stranger.
W. C.:
Bro. Guide, you will retire to the outer cave and prepare the candidate.
Guide retires in form and asks candidate:
Do you believe in education?
Cand. answers.
Guide hoodwinks cand. and puts hy tn on h, and after entering leads him around cave once over rough road.
S. C. stops cand. suddenly by placing both hands on his shoulders and in a very determined voice says:
Stand, hold intruders; what seekest thou?
G.:
Worthy Sub-Chief, we are from the outer world, groping in darkness and seeking knowledge. The way is so rough, and our progress so slow I am almost disheartened, and have a mind to turn back.
S. C.:
You say you come from the outer world seeking knowledge. Why leave you your brethren in darkness and seek knowledge alone.
G.:
Am I my brother's keeper?
S. C.:
As you would do unto yourself, so do you unto your brother; for you cannot raise yourself unless you lift up your brother with you.
G.:
Thou speakest with wisdom; but I must find the way myself.
S. C.:
Have courage, my friend; though the road may be long and tedious, it will be well worth the effort when you have at last reached the goal.
G.:
I thank you, Worthy Sub-Chief. We will have courage.
S. C.:
Remember, my friend, God said, "Let there be light," and it was even so; for God doth knew that in the day that ye eat thereof then your eyes shall be opened and ye shall be as Gods, knowing good from evil. Are you willing to eat of the fruit of knowledge?
Cand. answers.
S. C.:
You may now proceed on your way; but never ignore any little things, for everything has a small beginning, and where you must begin is to lay aside your superstition, as a man blinded by superstition cannot learn to see things in their true light. Are you willing to lay aside all superstition?
Cand. answers.
Guide removes hoodwink and conducts cand. to W. C., and says:
Worthy Chief, we are seeking knowledge. and were directed to you to point the way.
W. C.:
My friend, before you can be permitted to proceed farther it will be necessary for you to take an obligation that will not conflict with your civil or religious rights. Are you willing to take this obligation?
Cand. answers.
Guide places cand. before altar; cand. lights his light and places his right hand on book.
W. C.:
You will repeat after me, using your name where I use mine.


Obligation

I, , do solemnly promise and vow by the blessed Light of Reason, and upon this Book of Knowledge, that I will forever keep forever secret all that I may see, hear, or experience in this or any other degree of this order. Moreover, 1st: I w n u b m b w m m, I w a a a a w b t a k i w h m c t d, I w n b f w a a b, n w i c t h b u p o p, n w i c l w a b u i h f e a m w t o, b i w d h c a r 1: h f a h r: a h r t a f e o b t. a i f t d t i h t m l s b e a i b l i t d f e.
Brethren in concert:
It shall be done.
W. C.:
Therefore, my brother, be ever steadfast and unmovable in the work; forasmuch as you know that your labor is not in vain, and in this confidence I will now instruct you in the secret work of this degree. G. D. S. P. W.
W. C.:
My brother, great are the lessons we learn from experience. Education and all advancement are forced upon us by sheer necessity; in fact, progress is the child of necessity. The path of knowledge is a most difficult path and beset with hardship and discouragement at every turn. My friend, you seem to have traveled a long way and are much fatigued with that burden of ignorance.
Would you that I remove the burden?
Cand. answers.
W. C.:
The path that leads to the goal you seek is a rough and rugged trail.
There is no royal road in life to freedom of the mind,
No royal road to wealth of thought; one path for all mankind.
Man's highest good no more conserves by myths, though honored ln their day,
Now simply asks for Reason's light to light and point the way.
Our pathway here on every side is hedged with cares and tears,
One constant struggle to be free from darkness, doubt and fears.
No light of reason comes man's pathway to illume
The day-star of his hope to be, from the cradle to the tomb.



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